If you are not already horrified by any of the world's violence, then go ahead and check out these stories. They horrified me. They may horrify you. If this turns out to be a campaign of the horrified, so be it.

Once you wake up from a nightmare, to find yourself drowning,
it's time to save yourself, and anyone else you can.


The Cost of War



click here to learn more



From UNITED FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE
www.unitedforpeace.org
1) The Israeli attacks started on December 27. To date, Israel has killed well over 1,300 Palestinians -- this includes over 400 children and injured over 5,200, leaving hundreds of people maimed for life. 46% of those are women and children. Israel has now four times bombed United Nations targets, including the UN Gaza headquarters, which included thousands of pounds of refugee food aid, and three UN schools. Israel has also targeted at least six hospitals, ambulances, and UN food aid convoys. The Israeli attacks have also damaged over 20,000 residential buildings.

2) Israel began its assault on Gaza after months of a very tight blockade of Gaza had left its 1.5 million residents without essential supplies, such as water, food, fuel, medicine, and electricity.

3) The population of Gaza is 2/3 refugee and more than half are under the age of 16. The UN has listed Gaza as the most densely populated area in the world with a population density that is higher than that of Manhattan in New York City.

4) Israel has a responsibility as the occupying force under international humanitarian law, including the Geneva Conventions, and the laws of war to avoid harm of civilians in Gaza. Israel's limited 2005 withdrawal from Gaza did not constitute an ending of its occupation under international law.

5) Israel's actions with the tight blockade on the 1.5-million people in Gaza is a violation of those laws. Israel's attacks have destroyed 13 mosques, targeted several hospitals and ambulances resulting in the killing of over 16 paramedics, and targeted and destroyed three UN-operated schools; in one incident killing 40 Palestinians who sought shelter inside the school. Israeli military shelling also hit the UN Gaza headquarters, causing several injuries and leaving the compound and its thousands of pounds of refugee food aid in flames.

6) Israeli's attacks on Gaza and its confirmed use (based on both the United Nations and Human Rights Watch) of White Phosphorus artillery shells (an incendiary weapon prohibited by the 1980 Geneva Convention and customary international law from use in civilian areas) calls for an immediate investigation by the United Nations and objective review by the International Committee of the Red Cross.

7) The timing of the strikes calls into question Israel's political motivation as this comes in the final days of a lame-duck U.S. administration and one-month before a hotly-contested Israeli election in which the challenger is attacking the incumbent for being "soft" on security.

8) It is time for the U.S. to take its proper role as an honest broker in the conflict and to live up to its promise as a champion of freedom, liberty, justice, and hope.

9) An immediate cessation of hostilities on all sides and a complete end to the blockade is the only way to reinstate and maintain a cease-fire agreement that will ensure the security of both Israelis and Palestinians.

10) Israel did not allow journalists into Gaza to cover the situation which is in violation of Israel's own High Court ruling of December 31, 2008. The Foreign Press Association has called Israel's barring of journalists' access to Gaza as "a severe violation of press freedom."

11) The U.S. media has failed to fully report from a non-biased position. Numerous stations and papers are covering the Gaza attacks from the Israeli side only. The mainstream media in the US has thus far miserably failed in its news coverage of the humanitarian tragedy taking place in Gaza. Media outlets should recall the disproportion, context of occupation, and siege when mentioning the indiscriminate rocket attacks by Hamas on southern Israel.




Pakistan peace process under threat
Reuters | Saturday, 16 August 2008

India's prime minister said that last month's bombing of its embassy in Kabul had cast a shadow over a peace process with Pakistan, and he had expressed his disappointment and concern to Islamabad.

India has blamed Pakistan's spy agency for the July 7 attack in which two Indian diplomats were among 58 people killed. Pakistan has denied any involvement.

Addressing a huge gathering from the ramparts of New Delhi's historic Red Fort to mark independence day, Manmohan Singh said Pakistan must clamp down on terrorism..

He also called for peace in troubled Indian Kashmir, where separatists are protesting in the streets and Hindus have clashed with Muslims over a stalled land deal for a Hindu temple. India's portion of Kashmir is the country's only Muslim-majority state.

At least 27 people have been killed since June in some of the biggest protests since a revolt against Indian rule broke out in Kashmir in 1989.



Conflicting provisions between peace pacts, MNLF warns
By Marlon Ramos
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 20:51:00 08/03/2008
MANILA, Philippines--The impending signing of the memorandum of agreement (MOA) between the government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) might spark a new wave of violence and armed confrontations in Mindanao, ranking officers of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) warned on Sunday.

Witness: Bomb blast kills 15 in Somali capital

By MOHAMED SHEIKH NOR
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) — A bomb blast killed at least 15 people in the Somali capital on Sunday, witnesses said, as political divisions on both sides of the conflict deepened.


Eurosatory is the Premier International Rendezvous for all the actors of the Land and Airland Defence, and Security - June16-20 - Paris:

  • 60,000 m2 for indoor Exhibition, and 60,000 m2 for outdoor Exhibition,
  • 1,200 Exhibitors, from 50 countries,
  • 30 National Pavilions,
  • 72 % of International Companies,
  • The most complete range of Defence equipment (Products, Services & Industry sectors),
  • and 50,000 Visitors from 145 countries, 600 International Journalists, 110 Official Delegations. ----


The Pentagon Channel
1000 - Iraq Briefing
COL Terry Ferrell, Commander of 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, and John Smith, Embedded Provincial Reconstruction Team Leader, speak via satellite with reporters at the Pentagon, providing an update on ongoing security operations in Iraq. Encore presentations 1800 & 0600hrs.(Live, VoD, Podcast)


Behind TV Analysts, Pentagon’s Hidden Hand

The Foxes and the Henhouse

The New York Times exposed Military Analysts as the government pawns they are.
Is anyone going to notice??
Hello?



This is a site that opened my eyes to how the Holocaust got its speed. Horrifying, yes, but if we can learn the lessons, we can avoid this in the future. I dare you to watch the whole thing.

http://www.regent.edu/acad/schedu/uselesseaters/



From the DOD Contracts website, this caught my eye:


Odebrecht Construction Inc., New Orleans, La., was awarded on Oct. 31, 2007, a $41,823,140 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of a hurricane protection levee. Work will be performed in New Orleans, La., and is expected to be completed by Oct. 30, 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. There were an unknown number of bids solicited via the World Wide Web on Sept. 5, 2007, and five bids were received. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-08-C-0007).




It's good to know I'm not alone - This article is from TruthDig.com. THIS is what "The Investor's War" is all about. And, if any peaceloving investor wants to make a difference, then now is the time to divest themselves of stocks with the war companies, and put their money where their mouth is.

Robert Scheer's Columns

Cashing In on Terror

[[http://www.truthdig.com/report/email/20071030_scheer_column_cashing_in/|]]
Posted on Oct 30, 2007
jet fighter
jet fighter

AP photo / Junji Kurokawa

By Robert Scheer
Not to stoke any of the inane conspiracy theories running wild on the Internet, but if Osama bin Laden wasn’t on the payroll of Lockheed Martin or some other large defense contractor, he deserves to have been. What a boondoggle 9/11 has been for the merchants of war, who this week announced yet another quarter of whopping profits made possible by George Bush’s pretending to fight terrorism by throwing money at outdated Cold War-style weapons systems.
Lockheed Martin, the nation’s top weapons manufacturer, reaped a 22 percent increase in profits, while rivals for the defense buck, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics, increased profits by 62 percent and 22 percent, respectively. Boeing’s profits jumped 61 percent, spiked this quarter by its commercial division, but Boeing’s military division, like the others, has been doing very well indeed since the terrorist attacks. As Newsweek International put in August: “Since 9/11 and the U.S.-led wars that followed, shares in American defense companies have outperformed both the Nasdaq and Standard & Poor’s stock indices by some 40 percent. Prior to the recent cascade of stock prices worldwide, Boeing’s share prices had tripled over the past five years while Raytheon’s had doubled.”
Not bad for an industry in serious difficulty with the sudden collapse of the Cold War at the beginning of the 1990s, when the first President Bush and his defense secretary, Dick Cheney, were severely cutting the military budget for high-ticket planes and ships designed to fight the no-longer-existent Soviet military. Sure, they had Iraq to kick around, but the elder Bush never thought to turn the then very real aggression of Saddam Hussein into an enormously expensive quagmire. He both defeated Hussein and cut the military budget.
Not so Bush the younger, who exploited the trauma of 9/11 as an occasion to depose the defanged dictator of Iraq and thus provide a “shock and awe” showcase for the arms industry, which continues to benefit obscenely from the failed occupation. The second Iraq war, irrationally conflated with the 9/11 attack that had nothing to do with Hussein, provided the perfect threat package to justify the most outrageous military boondoggle in the nation’s history. The bin Laden boys only had an arsenal of $3 knives, but Bush claimed Hussein had WMD. Sadly for the military-industrial complex, Hussein’s army collapsed all too suddenly. But the insurgency, much of it fueled by the Shiites, who were ostensibly on our side, provided the occasion for pretending that we are in a war against a conventionally armed and imposing military enemy.
Of course, we are in nothing of the sort with this so-called war on terror, a propaganda farce that draws resources away from serious efforts to counter terrorism to reward the corporations that profit from high-tech weaponry that has little if anything to do with the problem at hand. As Columbia professor Richard K. Betts points out in Foreign Affairs magazine: “With rare exceptions, the war against terrorists cannot be fought with army tank battalions, air force wings, or naval fleets—the large conventional forces that drive the defense budget. The main challenge is not killing the terrorists but finding them, and the capabilities most applicable to this task are intelligence and special operations forces. ... It does not require half a trillion dollars worth of conventional and nuclear forces.”
That half a trillion only covers the Pentagon budget for expenses beyond the cost of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars or the Department of Homeland Security. Those last three items total more than $240 billion in Bush’s 2008 budget requests. Add to that the $50 billion spent on intelligence agencies and an equal amount of State Department-directed efforts and you can understand how we manage to spend more fighting a gang of mujahedeen terrorists, once our “freedom fighters” in that earlier Afghan war against the Soviets, than we did at the height of the Cold War.
The Pentagon currently absorbs more than half of the federal government’s discretionary budget,” writes Lawrence J. Korb, “surpassing the heights reached when I was President Reagan’s assistant secretary of defense. ... And, much like the 1980s, we are spending billions of dollars on weapons systems designed to fight the Soviet superpower.”
Thanks to bin Laden and Bush’s exploitation of “war on terror” hysteria, the taxpayers have been hoodwinked into paying for a sophisticated military arsenal to fight a Soviet enemy that no longer exists. The Institute for Policy Studies calculated last year that the top 34 CEOs of the defense industry have earned a combined billion dollars since 9/11; they should give bin Laden his cut.




TEHRAN (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin made clear to Washington on Tuesday that Russia would not accept military action against Iran and he invited Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to Moscow for talks.
  • Afghan children watch as Afghan National Army troops and Canadian soldiers from the NATO-led coalition conduct a foot patrol through the main market in the Taliban stronghold of Panjwaii town, Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan, October 16, 2007. (Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters)
    Afghan children watch as Afghan National Army troops and Canadian soldiers from the NATO-led coalition conduct a foot patrol through the main market in the Taliban stronghold of Panjwaii town, Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan, October 16, 2007. (Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters)
    Canada sees troops staying longer in Afghanistan 33 minutes ago
OTTAWA (Reuters) - The Canadian government said on Tuesday it wanted its military contingent in Afghanistan to stay until 2011, two years longer than planned, but was coy about how many troops would remain and exactly what they would be doing.
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States and Israel agreed to work on a layered missile defense system to intercept ballistic missiles from Iran and Syria and smaller arms like those lobbed from Gaza and Lebanon, officials said on Tuesday.
  • An activist holds up a portrait of Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi outside Government House as United Nations special envoy to Myanmar Ibrahim Gambari meets Thailand's Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont in Bangkok October 15, 2007. Gambari told Myanmar on Monday to stop arresting dissidents even as the military junta vowed to plough on with its 'roadmap to democracy' regardless of widespread international criticism. (Chaiwat Subprasom - /Reuters)
    An activist holds up a portrait of Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi outside Government House as United Nations special envoy to Myanmar Ibrahim Gambari meets Thailand's Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont in Bangkok October 15, 2007. Gambari told Myanmar on Monday to stop arresting dissidents even as the military junta vowed to plough on with its 'roadmap to democracy' regardless of widespread international criticism. (Chaiwat Subprasom - /Reuters)
    Myanmar jails alleged protesters: relatives Tue Oct 16, 11:33 AM ET
YANGON (Reuters) - Closed courts have sentenced five Myanmar protesters, all members of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi's opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) party, to long jail terms, relatives said on Tuesday.
  • A group of US Army soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division walk past concertina wire in the late afternoon at camp Black Jack near Baghdad, in 2004. The US army is spending big money on bonuses designed to attract new recruits and retain its best soldiers in a bid to overcome a reluctance to re-enlist fueled by the Iraq war and the temptations of the private sector.(AFP/File/Roberto Schmidt)
    A group of US Army soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division walk past concertina wire in the late afternoon at camp Black Jack near Baghdad, in 2004. The US army is spending big money on bonuses designed to attract new recruits and retain its best soldiers in a bid to overcome a reluctance to re-enlist fueled by the Iraq war and the temptations of the private sector.(AFP/File/Roberto Schmidt)
    "Love thy enemy" -- U.S. soldier gets discharge Tue Oct 16, 3:32 PM ET
NEW YORK (Reuters) - A U.S. soldier who said his Christian beliefs compelled him to love his enemies, not kill them, has been granted conscientious objector status and honorably discharged, a civil liberties group said on Tuesday.
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Key Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday joined Republicans to warn that a resolution calling the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman Turks genocide could harm U.S. strategic interests.
  • Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan (L) and Iraq's Vice President Tareq al-Hashemi (R) pose for the media before a meeting in Ankara October 16, 2007. (Adem Altan/Pool/Reuters)
    Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan (L) and Iraq's Vice President Tareq al-Hashemi (R) pose for the media before a meeting in Ankara October 16, 2007. (Adem Altan/Pool/Reuters)
    Iraq urges Turkey to seek peaceful solution Tue Oct 16, 1:16 PM ET
ANKARA (Reuters) - Iraq urged Turkey on Tuesday not to launch a major attack on Kurdish separatists in northern Iraq after Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan said Ankara would strike the rebels when the timing and conditions were right.



At least 65 militants killed in Pakistan Monday, 8 Oct 2007
MIRANSHAH, Pakistan (Reuters) - At least 65 pro-Taliban militants and 25 Pakistani soldiers were killed in new clashes in Pakistan's North Waziristan on Monday, the military said. Full Article
Photo
Photo
Bombs kill 21 in Iraq 3:48am BST
BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A series of bomb attacks in Iraq on Monday killed 21 people, including 10 civilians near a police station north of Baghdad, police said. Full Article | Video


U.N. official says Darfur violence at risk of spreading Monday, 8 Oct 2007
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Worsening violence in Darfur risks spreading the conflict further in Sudan and shows the need for advanced equipment a planned U.N. peacekeeping force does not yet have, a senior U.N. official said on Monday. Full Article




October 1, 2007
Burmese monks 'to be sent away'
Burmese people eat on the streets of Rangoon
Burmese people eat on the streets of Rangoon
Monks are absent, but people in Rangoon are going about their lives
Thousands of monks detained in Burma's main city of Rangoon will be sent to prisons in the far north of the country, sources have told the BBC.
About 4,000 monks have been rounded up in the past week as the military government has tried to stamp out pro-democracy protests.
They are being held at a disused race course and a technical college.
Sources from a government-sponsored militia said they would soon be moved away from Rangoon.
The monks have been disrobed and shackled, the sources told BBC radio's Burmese service. There are reports that the monks are refusing to eat.
The country has seen almost two weeks of sustained popular unrest, in the most serious challenge to the military leadership for more than two decades.



July 28, 2007
Iraqis Blame Surge in Cancer on US Depleted Uranium
That's quite a legacy to leave the Iraqi people, isn't it?
Camp Al Asad's Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) junkyard
Remember, each of these twisted hunks of metal represents humans that were in them when they were blown up by IEDs.
Craig Joint Theater Hospital, Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan
This is a vignette of Liaqat, a 5--year-old boy flown to CJTH after getting shot in the gut accidentally while playing near his home in Asadabad by an Afghan soldier who fumbled his AK-47 at a nearby vehicle checkpoint.
Air Force role will grow with AfriCom
AfriCom is being created from the three commands — European Command, Central Command and Pacific Command — that for decades have had responsibility for certain parts of the continent. Defense Secretary Robert Gates called that an “outdated arrangement left over from the Cold War.” AfriCom headquarters will remain in Europe for now, but eventually it will move to Africa, officials have said.



July 27, 2007
Defence Weekly
Defence in 2020 and Beyond Conference
Baghdad market car bomb kills 25


June 2, 2007
Four charged in plot to blow up New York airport
Lebanon army pounds camp
U.S. fires at al Qaeda target in Somalia
Violence as 30,000 join G-8 demos
Pulling the plug on a popular TV station, Chávez silences disssent
'A ticking nuclear time bomb'

May 30, 2007

7 killed as U.S. copter crashes in Afghanistan

Russia Tests New Multi-Warhead Missile
UNHCR Expresses Concern Over Death And Injuries Of Bhutanese Refugees By Indian Police
Israel Kills Two Gaza Gunmen
Two Palestinian terrorist gunmen were killed on Wednesday morning when Israeli warplanes fired into the Gaza Strip.

Turkey troops head to Iraq border

Yemen buys bombs from everyday folks

Rice Discourages Israeli-Syrian Peace Talks



May 28 2007


Memorial Day 05/27/07

Chopper attack, bombs kill 8 U.S. troops in Iraq

Eight U.S. troops were killed in Iraq on Monday in a deadly chain of events that began when a U.S. helicopter crashed, apparently shot down by small-arms fire, according to a U.S. military official. A military vehicle rushing to the helicopter crash site was hit by an exploding roadside bomb, and a second "quick-reaction force" vehicle also was hit, the official said.


Five Britons abducted in Iraq, 10 U.S. troops killed



Five Britons abducted in Iraq, 10 U.S. troops killed]]= BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Gunmen in police uniforms kidnapped five Britons in Baghdad on Tuesday and the deaths of 10 U.S. soldiers were announced, making May the deadliest month for the U.S. military in more than two years.



May 24,2007

What is he doing, asking for it?????
Israeli missile strikes near Palestinian PM's home
U.S. voices concern over new Chinese weaponry

U.S. navy begins war games on Iran's doorstep

Online War Games




May 23, 2007. One bad day.

Amid tensions with Tehran, US displays naval power in Gulf - 05/23/07
AU says U.N. needs 3-4 months to get Darfur soldiers in - 05/23/07
India boosts Mumbai WTC security after threat - 05/23/07
Lebanon issues ultimatum to militants - 05/23/07